Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Silent Sympathy


Then they sat there on the ground with him for seven days and nights without saying a word, because they saw how much he was suffering. (Job 2:13)














If it is your duty and privilege as a christian to call on someone who has recently been bereaved beware of the danger of over reacting to the situation.
It is advisable to prepare yourself with a short prayer, offered in the quietness of your mind that you will be sensitive to the need of the one whom you are visiting.

Remember the loss is theirs and not yours. Do not become so closely identified with their sorrow that you lose your sense of perspective. If you lose your mental and spiritual poise you will be unable to give them comfort and strength in their grief.
Lady in Outdoor Mourning Dress Visits a Friend
Lady in Outdoor Mourning Dress Visits a Friend

On such occasions, there is a human tendency to talk too much. Silence, if filled with love,sympathy and understanding can possess healing qualities for the broken hearted.

Sympathy can often be expressed in service. Small deeds of kindness can show what is felt but cannot be said. A cup of tea or simple meal shared in love can ease an aching heart.

Tea for Two by Leila Cahillane
Tea for Two

  • Offer companionship by being available, but do not intrude.
  • Real comfort is the assurance of your prayerful support, for in doing this you are allowing the Comforting Christ to work through you.
Weeping Girl Attracts the Sympathy of Her Dog by John Henry
Weeping Girl Attracts the Sympathy of Her Dog


Help me, O Lord,
to be able to give comfort and strength
to the bereaved
through the Power of Your Indwelling Spirit.

Mimi

pictures courtesy of
all posters

10 comments:

Lisa said...

What a beautiful post. I agree with you. Silent sympathy is so respectful. Blessings. Lisa

Cathy said...

Just beautiful, Mimi ~ and how true ~

Mike Golch said...

I believe the best thing is just to be there,and when the person wants to talk they will.

Me said...

Remember the loss is theirs and not yours. Do not become so closely identified with their sorrow that you lose your sense of perspective. If you lose your mental and spiritual poise you will be unable to give them comfort and strength in their grief.

This is very important to remember

Tracy said...

What a beautiful post. Thank you.

Maxine said...

This post touched my heart, Mimi. And the pictures were so captivating. All of them. We can learn great lessons from Job's friends, at least the way they were at the beginning. And I agree that so often we have the tendency to talk too much. I really liked this.

Dawn said...

Our church has been going through this since the death of Dan - we are learning a lot together.

Denise said...

Oh that was beautiful! What words of wisdom!!!!!!!

Mary said...

Mimi,

What an inspirational post and so beautiful. Great advice! Sometimes just being in the same room or holding someone's hand makes all the difference in the world.

Please drop over to my Writing Nook and enter my Harvest Giveaway.

Blessings for a great weekend.
Mary

~Red Tin Heart~ said...

Really good post. I think this is so true.
There have been so many people whio have told me I should be getting over losing John by now.
It hurts so much.
Sending you love, Nita